Published 28 April 2017, by Joseph Booysen, Business Report 

South African businesses and business leaders can learn a lot by attending the World Economic Forum, taking what they need out of the global perspectives on offer, applying approaches and principles learned from world business leaders to their own business, with a firm eye on maximising the business volumes of the future so as to avoid business extinction.

This is according to Khalid Abdulla, group chief executive of African Equity Empowerment Investment (AEEI) ahead of his attendance at the global forum next week.

Abdulla said it was important to think globally about how current and future business was planned for and approached – Africa would soon have 2 billion people living on the continent and the world 9billion people in the not-too-distant future.

“We need to listen to what other countries and businesses are experiencing, assimilate the different perspectives and then apply the appropriate practices and innovations to our own,” Abdulla said, adding that it would be important for businesses to develop the right team and to implement solid corporate governance to extract the most value.

“So, you can attend all the conferences in the world, but if you don’t apply and implement what you learn, it is just going to be another certificate on the wall.”

He said despite all the negative news in the country at the moment, including the recent ratings downgrade, there was still much to be positive about as South Africa had achieved amazing things.

“We must celebrate these while working on the challenges,” he said.

Abdulla encouraged other companies to continue sharing these and other positive stories in order to keep hope alive for the country’s citizens, while current challenges were being addressed, in order to build the nation on a sustainable basis.

“There is an opportunity in everything. As a business leader one has to see things in context while at the same time we have to think out of the box. This current state too shall pass, and we as business need to look to the future and ask ourselves if we will be ready for when that time comes.”

Read the full article here.

 

 

 Published 27 April 2017 by IOL reporter
Manuel Rodrigues, a blind child rights activist from Guinea-Bissau, on Wednesday received the child rights award, The World’s Children’s Prize (WCP), often called the ‘Children’s Nobel Prize’.

This is the result of the Global Vote, by millions of children around the world.

Manuel Rodrigues from Guinea-Bissau, bottom right, was selected by children around the world to receive child rights award the World’s Children’s Prize for the Rights of the Child. Molly Melching is second from the left, and Rosi Gollmann is fourth from the left. Behind them are members of the Child Jury.

Manuel was honoured in recognition of his work for children with disabilities, who face being kept hidden or abandoned to die.

In Guinea-Bissau, it is hard for children with disabilities to go to school. Many have been kept hidden away, or abandoned to die. Through Manuel’s work, however, both attitudes and legislation are changing rapidly, so that children with different abilities can grow up in safety, attend school, and have a good life.

Manuel was one of the three nominees for the award, nominated by a child jury whose members are experts on the rights of the child, through their own life experiences as refugees, slaves and soldiers, amongst others.

Since the launch in 2000, a total of 40.6 million children have participated in the World’s Children’s Prize programme, the world’s largest annual educational initiative for children on rights and democracy.

Two other child rights activists, 90-year-old Rosi Gollmann, from Germany, and Molly Melching, from the USA and Senegal, were also honoured on Wednesday.

Gollman’s work includes rescuing tens of thousands of girls in India from being killed at birth, and Melching has led pioneering initiatives to tackle female genital cutting and child marriage in West Africa.

Both received the World’s Children’s Honorary Award.

All three nominees for the award were honoured at a ceremony today at Gripsholm Castle, in Mariefred, Sweden, where children from 15 countries were assisted by H.M. Queen Silvia of Sweden in presenting the prizes. The prize money, totalling SEK 700,000, is split between this year’s child rights hero (SEK 350 000) and the two honorary award laureates (SEK 175 000 each) and is to go towards the prize laureates’ work with children.

Abatsha, a young band from Cape Town, South Africa, played at the WCP Ceremony. Five of the band members are pupils at Chris Hani Secondary School in Khayelitsha, where the World’s Children’s Prize programme is implemented annually, and where the band members and other pupils are trained as WCP Child Rights Ambassadors.

Previous prize laureates include the children’s Decade Child Rights Heroes Graça Machel and Nelson Mandela, Ann Skelton, Hector Pieterson and Nkosi Johnson (the latter two, posthumously).

Read the full article here.

Today it was revealed that Manuel Rodrigues, a blind child rights activist from Guinea-Bissau, has been selected to receive the child rights award, The World’s Children’s Prize (WCP), often called the ‘Children’s Nobel Prize’ by the global media. This is the result of the Global Vote, by millions of children around the world. Manuel was honoured in recognition of his work for children with disabilities, who face being kept hidden or abandoned to die.

Since the launch in 2000, a total of 40,6 million children have participated in the World’s Children’s Prize programme, the world’s largest annual educational initiative for children on rights and democracy.

Two other child rights activists, 90-year-old Rosi Gollmann, from Germany, and Molly Melching, from the USA and Senegal, are also being honoured today. Rosi Gollman’s work includes rescuing tens of thousands of girls in India from being killed at birth, and Molly Melching has led pioneering initiatives to tackle female genital cutting and child marriage in West Africa. Both receive the World’s Children’s Honorary Award.

Previous prize laureates include the children’s Decade Child Rights Heroes Graça Machel and Nelson Mandela, Ann Skelton, Hector Pieterson and Nkosi Johnson (the latter two, posthumously).

 Today, Åsa Regnér, Sweden’s Minister for Children, became a new patron. Others who have shown their support for the WCP by becoming patrons include the late Nelson Mandela, Malala Yousafzai, Desmond Tutu, H.M. Queen Silvia of Sweden, and Swedish Prime Minister, Stefan Löfven.

In Guinea-Bissau, it is hard for children with disabilities to go to school. Many have been kept hidden away, or abandoned to die. Through Manuel’s work, however, both attitudes and legislation are changing rapidly, so that children with different abilities can grow up in safety, attend school, and have a good life.

Manuel was one of the three nominees for the award, nominated by a child jury whose members are experts on the rights of the child, through their own life experiences as refugees, slaves and soldiers, amongst others.

Prize laureates honoured in Sweden

All three nominees for the award were honoured at a ceremony today at Gripsholm Castle, in Mariefred, Sweden, where children from 15 countries were assisted by H.M. Queen Silvia of Sweden in presenting the prizes. The prize money, totalling SEK 700,000, is split between this year’s child rights hero (SEK 350,000) and the two honorary award laureates (SEK 175,000 each) and is to go towards the prize laureates’ work with children.

Abatsha, a young band from Cape Town, South Africa, played at the WCP Ceremony. Five of the band members are pupils at Chris Hani Secondary School in Khayelitsha, where the World’s Children’s Prize programme is implemented annually, and where the band members and other pupils are trained as WCP Child Rights Ambassadors. Band members are: Simbongile Sam, Zintle Kati, Aerin Van den Bergh, Deaviah Moodley, Vuyisani Mkwambi, Athenkosi Halu, Bonga Hatana and Clayton Seas.

 More info and press photos at worldschildrensprize.org/media

 Empowering vulnerable children

The majority of the millions of children who participate in the programme live in countries affected by poverty and conflict, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Pakistan and Zimbabwe. Through the WCP programme, they have learned that they have rights and have been able to make their voices heard, many for the first time.

The WCP is supported by almost 70,000 schools in 115 countries, and by over 750 organisations, institutions and departments of education. Since the launch of the programme, half a million teachers have been trained to teach their pupils about children’s rights and democracy in their schools.

Global legends as patrons

Many public figures have shown their support for the WCP by becoming patrons, including the late Nelson Mandela, Malala Yousafzai, Desmond Tutu, H.M. Queen Silvia of Sweden, and Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven. Today, the Swedish Minister for Children, Åsa Regnér, became a new patron. South African patrons also include the late Ahmed Kathrada, Dr Iqbal Survé and the singer, Vusi ‘The Voice’ Mahlasela.

We are behind the World’s Children’s Prize
The World’s Children’s Prize Foundation (WCPF) is supported by donors including the Swedish Postcode Lottery, Sida (the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency), Forum Syd, Julia & Hans Rausing Trust, Care about the Children (H.M. Queen Silvia’s foundation) and the Survé Family Foundation (part of Survé Philanthropies).

Contact in South Africa

Marlene Winberg: marlene.winberg@worldschildrensprize.org Tel. 083 392 5153

Contact in Sweden
Carmilla Floyd: carmilla.floyd@worldschildrensprize.org Tel. +46-709-507407

Magnus Bergmar: magnus.bergmar@worldschildrensprize.org Tel. +46-705-155839

 

More information and press images at worldschildrensprize.org/media-room

PRESS RELEASE

The Executive Chairman of Sekunjalo Investment Holdings and Independent Media, Dr Iqbal Survé, is pleased to announce the appointment of Howard Plaatjes as Chief Operations Officer (COO) for Independent Media.

 

Plaatjes, who currently holds the position of Group Executive: Trading Performance and Operations, joined Independent Media in August 2013.  During this time, he was responsible for overseeing the alignment of the company’s printing, distribution and circulation operations with a focus on optimizing efficiencies and cost saving.  Plaatjes was also responsible for establishing and monitoring performance reporting systems and participated in the development and co-ordination of operating budgets and strategic plans.

 

“In the evolving media environment, Howard’s penchant for risk assessment and building turnaround strategies is going to be critical to ensure that Independent Media achieves its growth strategy.  I have every confidence in Howard and wish him success with his new portfolio,” said Dr Survé.

 

Commenting on his promotion, Plaatjes said that he was inspired and encouraged by the entrepreneurial approach and strategy of Independent Media.  “I look forward to working with the experienced team members as well as the energy of the many talented young people who have joined our organization over the past 18 months.  Together we will work towards transforming Independent Media into the leading content provider on the Continent,” said Plaatjes.

 

Recently, Plaatjes was at the helm of Independent Media’s redesign process and the implementation of the company’s new business strategy which started in mid-2016. This process has culminated in the expansion of Independent Media’s operations to include specialized content business units for lifestyle, sports, business and politics.

 

Plaatjes has been a senior transformation and business performance turnaround specialist for over 25 years with experience in several sectors including telecommunication, retail, financial services, media, FMCG, online and oil and gas.

Ends.

PRESS RELEASE

The Executive Chairman of The Sekunjalo Investment Group,  Dr Iqbal Survé, is pleased to announce the appointment of Zenariah Barends as Senior Executive for the Group.

Barends’ association with The Sekunjalo Group goes back to 1998 when she was a member of the team responsible for the listing of the fledgling BEE investment company on the JSE.  At Sekunjalo, Barends held various senior positions, working closely with the office of the CEO and Executive Chairman, Dr Iqbal Survé.

In her new position as Senior Executive for the holding company, Barends’ expanded portfolio will include management responsibility for legal services, communication and media liaison, multi-lateral engagement, international relations, talent development, academic engagement and transformation.

Commenting on Barends’ appointment, Dr Survé said, “I am pleased to be making this announcement about Zenariah’s new position. I have known her for two decades, since she joined the Sekunjalo Group as a young woman, fresh out of heading an Investigative Unit at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). She has consistently demonstrated her capacity to learn, lead and rise to new challenges. Her appointment at the holding company is a logical step as we strengthen the leadership and management capacity at Sekunjalo”.

Barends expressed her delight, “I started at Sekunjalo at 1998, when we had very little, using doors as tables and sharing chairs. To be part of the history of a company which is purpose-driven, committed to transformation and excellence makes me so proud. In my new position, I want to continue to contribute to the growth and development of Sekunjalo and it’s people.”

Barends retains her position as Chief of Staff of Independent Media.  She is also a board member of JSE-listed AEEI (Pty) Ltd, where she chairs the Transformation Committee. In addition, she serves in various capacities in Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) including as Chairperson of the Board of Trustees of Inyathelo: The South African Institute for Advancement and the Delft Big Band. Zenariah has a strong passion for the development of the arts and was a founder member of the Cape Cultural Collective.

Historically, Zenariah has a varied career journey, with history in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), an institute set up to investigate human rights abuses during Apartheid, where she headed up the Western Cape Investigative Unit. Zenariah also has an education background, as a researcher at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) Education Policy Unit (EPU) where she conducted research into post-apartheid higher education policy. Prior to that, she was a Sociology lecturer at UWC.

Ends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published 13 April 2017 by Business Report.  

Small Business Development Minister Lindiwe Zulu said South Africa will weather problems associated with the recent credit rating downgrade to junk status.Speaking at a business forum between South Africa and Qatar in Pretoria on Wednesday, Zulu moved to allay investor jitters over the downgrades, charging that the government was ready to deal with concerns raised by investors and rating agencies.

“It is not the first time that we are finding ourselves in this,” Zulu said.

Minister of Small Business Development Lindiwe Zulu, Qatar Minister of Economy and Trade HE Sheik Ahmed bin Jassim bin Mohammed Al-Thani, Dr Iqbal Survé, Sekunjalo chairperson, and South African Ambassador to Qatar, Shirish Soni, at the RSA-State of Qatar Business Forum in Pretoria. Photo: Simphiwe Mbokazi

“The government has taken upon ourselves as government, the private sector and our communities to work together to weather the storms. It is going to be a very difficult period for us. We shall weather the storm working together.”

Ratings agencies S&P’s Global Ratings and Fitch Ratings last week downgraded the country’s credit rating to sub-investment grade. The South African Reserve Bank earlier this week said the downgrades could put pressure on the rand and accelerate inflation.

Zulu’s assurances came as President Jacob Zuma hosted the Emir of the State of Qatar, Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani, who was on a state visit to South Africa which was, among others, aimed at deepening economic relations between the two countries.

In a statement on Tuesday, the Presidency said that the total trade between South Africa and Qatar had increased from R4 billion in 2012 to R7 billion last year.

One of South Africa’s largest investments in the Middle East is Sasol’s joint venture gas-to-liquid facility located in Qatar.

Commitment

“[The] two heads of state have agreed to advance our relations to a strategic level in demonstration of our commitment towards strengthening our economic relations.

“In as much as fostering partnership among business communities is important, it is equally imperative that we emerge from these engagements with a structured programme of co-operation,” said Zulu.

Numerous opportunities of co-operation existed between South Africa and Qatar in agro-processing, financial services, mineral beneficiation, petrochemicals, aerospace and defence, infrastructure development and tourism.

She said South Africa’s focus on radical economic transformation opened up opportunities to all South Africans, with focus on black South Africans.

“In line with South Africa’s commitment to radical economic transformation, we must ensure adequate participation of black entrepreneurs.

“The bottom line is that and there is no compromise land was taken away from the majority of our people.

“That has to change if we are to make sure there is peace, security and stability in South Africa.

“This should not scare any of our investors. Your investment in South Africa will always be safe, because in South Africa we have very strong institutions, whether its institutions of governance or financial institutions. We make sure that anybody who comes to South Africa with their investment is protected,” she said. South Africa had prioritised the creation of black industrialists and the integration of small- and medium-sized enterprises, she said.

“The black industrialists are the people that you would need to have more engagement with.”

She said there were numerous investment opportunities in South Africa and the rest of the continent.

“The continent is on the move, with a whole lot of construction happening.

Al-Thani said South Africa could use Qatar’s location and logistics infrastructure to export to the Middle East, Asia and Europe. He said Qatar could also be a gateway for South African products to the Gulf Co-operation Council Common Market and the Greater Arab Free Trade Area.

 

Read the full article here.

Published 7 April 2017, by Bronwyn Davids, Cape Argus

Cape Town – The SA Jewish Board of Deputies (Cape) on Thursday night celebrated the Passover Seder, a “celebration of human rights overcoming human wrongs” – with fellow South Africans and African refugees of all faiths.Held at the Jewish Museum, among the guests were Western Cape Premier Helen Zille, executive chairperson of Sekunjalo Dr Iqbal Survé, Muslim and Christian clerics, and Judge Dennis Davis, who was the MC.

Usually, a 2 000-year-old family and community celebration rich in religious symbolism of the Hebrews’ exodus from captivity in ancient Egypt, SAJBD deputy director Gwynne Robins said: “We decided to share our tradition with others because there are lots of things we say in the Seder that is relevant to us today.

“We say all who are hungry come and eat, there’s so much hunger, famine in Somalia, there are people in Khayelitsha who go to bed hungry, we must remember a time of hunger in our history.

“We talk of being refugees; there are lots of refugees in South Africa and all over the world, from North Africa. There are so many problems. The point of the Haggadah book, which means ‘telling’, is that you shall tell your children what the Lord God did for us on that day of fleeing from Egypt. Education is important, part of this Seder,” said Robins.

Read the full article here.

 

Published 01 April 2017, by IOL Mojo.

The Sekunjalo Edujazz Big Band were the opening act for the 18th installment of the Cape Town International Jazz Festival, which officially kicked off at the Cape Town International Convention Centre on Friday evening.

For the next two days the Convention Centre will play host to famous as well as up-and-coming musical acts and also a number of exhibitions linked to the event.

Jazz lovers from across South Africa, and in fact the world, gather annually for the festival which is a showcase for some of the best local and international music acts.
Earlier this week, Capetonians were entertained by top acts at the annual free concert held at Greenmarket Square. The concert is considered the opening event of the musical showcase which draws thousands of people to the Mother City every year.
Read more here.