Affordable, accessible healthcare is still out of reach in many African countries, but innovative technology can greatly improve conditions. By Chelsea Lotz

Healthcare in Africa is vital – literally a matter of life or death. It defines the way people live, before and after an illness. However, for many people, decent healthcare is unaffordable or inaccessible. Africa remains the continent most in need of healthcare infrastructure, personnel, and equipment. Lack of access to healthcare is still a critical factor that creates difficulties for elderly, disabled, and economically disadvantaged people – particularly those living in remote locations.

African Indy WEF Africa 2019 issue For two decades, Health System Technologies (HST) has provided nearly 400 health-tech sites throughout Africa. By harnessing the power of telecommunications, the company delivers solution-based “telemedicine” services that drive results and assist in maintaining and restoring physical, mental, and emotional well-being.

Published 19 October 2018, by Dr Iqbal Survé

Tiso Blackstar’s Business Day could by all accounts be considered irrelevant due to its small daily circulation of approximately 20 000 nationally.

It is therefore easy to dismiss Business Day’s rantings and media manipulation as insignificant especially when compared to the reach of Business Report (BR) in the Independent Media stable, which has more than 1.5 million daily readers.

Why then would I write this opinion piece? Well, Tiso Blackstar and its Sunday publication, Sunday Times have recently been under the spotlight, especially after its editor, Bongani Siqoko, bravely apologised for their shameful violation of the press code and media manipulation on several matters including the so-called SARS “rogue unit”.

Subsequently three prominent journalists were named, including the editor of the Financial Mail, Rob Rose, who, it has been hinted, was either paid or manipulated, to write negative stories. This manipulation and fake news presented by Sunday Times, Financial Mail and Business Day can be regarded as part of a deep rotten culture.

Evidence of Tiso Blackstar’s hypocrisy is clear to see beyond the Sunday Times’s well reported accusations and manipulations. The Steinhoff debacle, for instance, is reported but covered with kid gloves by Tiso Blackstar and Business Day.

If anything, it is reported with a deferential attitude to the individuals involved. A second example is their reporting on the South African Post Office, which in its last financial year lost R978 million. Now if the Post Office was run by a black executive it would most certainly have been headlined with article after article screaming about the incompetence of the executive in charge.

A different standard is applied to white companies as opposed to black companies.

Reporting on white companies is always qualified with an excuse, while black companies are treated with contempt, disdain and suspicion. Let’s look at Tiso Blackstar. Formerly Johnnic and Times Media Group, it proved to be a task beyond even (now President) Cyril Ramaphosa and Tokyo Sexwale to transform this business.

In the case of Mvelaphanda, these businesses cost them billions and the current management and journalists have overseen the destruction of shareholder value, including a PIC loss of R7bn a few years ago. None of this is reported on by Business Day.

Perhaps it is because, according to well-placed sources at Tiso Blackstar, white management and journalists are paid more and given bonuses at the expense of black journalists. Business Day has a particular way of portraying black executives and black companies.

As an example, for many months, Business Day ran frontpage headlines about the PIC’s CEO, Dr Dan Matjila, who was allegedly in a romantic relationship with a woman called Pretty Louw despite Dr Matjila going on record in parliament denying any relationship.

Yet Business Day journalist, Carol Paton, rehashed this repeatedly in the Goebbels tradition of propaganda, revealing her bias towards a faction that wants Matjila removed for their own nefarious purposes. The recent Budlender report found unequivocally that Dr Matjila did not have a romantic or inappropriate relationship with Ms Louw.

Please read the full article here:

Published 18 October 2018, by Dr Iqbal Survé

President Cyril Ramaphosa has called the South African Investment Conference for October 25-27, 2018. The investment conference will hopefully attract solid investments into the South African economy.

With the low GDP growth of our economy, we need investments to fulfil the social mandate of the ruling party and government, to the majority of South African citizens.

South Africa’s high unemployment rate makes it imperative that we attract investment that should also result in further initiatives to reduce unemployment and inequality.

In China, investment under Deng Xiaoping after 1987 led to economic growth and almost 600 million people out of poverty.

More importantly, China has emerged as an industrialised economy and moved from a low-income country to a middle-income country.

What has perhaps not been noticed is that China is now on a par with the US in terms of the 4IR and platform initiatives or companies.

Many experts on the 4IR argue that China is on the verge of surpassing the US in the areas of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.

South Africa has a young population and the South African economy is increasingly digitalised. Disruption is occurring at every level in the South African economy, whether it is in the banking sector, retail, media or even in the large-scale mining and industrial economies.

Please read the full article here: